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The first rule of holes: when you're in one, stop digging.

- Molly Ivins


Tubular cast on

This technique is perhaps the loveliest way to cast on for a k1-p1 rib. The edge is firm but stretchy and so very professional looking. I've just learned to do this and am so glad I did! My Fisherman's Daughter is the first of many projects I'll be using it for. Here's how to do it:



For instances where the RS rows end with "p1, k1" work as follows:

With scrap yarn in a different color than the main color cast on half the number of stitches called for for an even number of stitches, rounding up for an odd number of stitches.
Switch to working yarn. Beg on WS purl 1 row. Cont in St st for 3 more rows. (For a less snug cast on, cont in St st for 1 more row.)

WS: P1, with LH needle pick up purl bump from first row of working yarn and knit into its back loop (see drawing below), *p1, pick up next purl bump from first row of working yarn and knit into its back loop; rep from * to last st; for an odd number of stitches purl last st; for an even number of stitches purl stitch then pick up the next half-bump of working yarn and knit into its back loop.

Remove waste yarn and work ribbing.


For instances where the RS rows end with "k1, p1" work as follows:

With scrap yarn in a different color than the main color cast on half the number of stitches called for plus one for an even number of stitches, or plus one half for an odd numbers of stitches.
Switch to working yarn. WS: K1, purl to end. RS: Knit to last st, p1. Rep last 2 rows. (For a less snug cast on, do not repeat.)

WS: K1, *p1, pick up next purl bump from first row of working yarn and knit into its back loop; rep from * to last st; for an even number of stitches purl last st; for an odd number of stitches purl stitch then pick up the next half-bump of working yarn and knit into its back loop.

Remove waste yarn and work ribbing.