Russian T

Here's a simple technique for eliminating loose ends when adding or subtracting strands of yarn.

It is similar to its cousin the Russian splice or Russian join, which is used to eliminate ends where an old color strand is being replaced with a new one.

But when a new strand is joining the fabric while the old strand remains, or when an old strand is leaving while there is no new strand replacing it, strand ends can also be eliminated by using this easy-to-work technique.

With a Russian splice, the two strand ends are linked in a pinky promise and then felted.




With a Russian T, only one strand is commited to the splice, while the other remains free to shift its position.





Here's how to apply the technique:

To join a new color strand



Split the end of the new strand roughly into two equal thicknesses, and break one of the halves off about 3" from the end. (This keeps the spliced portion of the yarn the same thickness as the rest.)

Wrap the end of the new strand around the old strand (anywhere along its span, wherever there's enough room to maneuver), and slightly overlap the end of the new strand over where it was broken.




To felt the new strand end to itself, rub the folded yarn end between the palms using a little moisture and plenty of friction, while leaving a tiny hole unfelted where the new strand wraps around the old one.




Slide the new strand along the old one, into position and ready to work a new row.


To end an old color strand

Here, we want the old strand to stop tidily at the end of a row.



To place it there, first work to the end of the row and break the yarn leaving a 1.5" tail,




then frog back 10-12 stitches to allow ample yarn length for working a splice.
Split the end of the old strand roughly into two equal thicknesses, and break one of the halves off 3" from the end (double the length of the tail from above picture).




Wrap the end of the old strand around the other strand (anywhere along its span, wherever there's enough room to maneuver); fold and splice the old strand.




Rework the frogged stitches to the end of the row. The old color should end at that point.




Pull the remaining strand through the loop of the splice.




Remaining strand is now in place and ready to begin a new row.


Important note:

These photos illustrate a spit splice technique that only works with woolen yarns. However, Susan Rainey's video demonstrating her No End Stripes technique, which inspired the technique shown here, also illustrates how to similarly join yarns of any fiber.