Two picot cast on styles using the knitted cast on

The knitted cast on forms the basis for two types of picot cast on.

This tutorial demonstrates first the knitted cast on,
then shows how to use it for a knitted-cast-on-bind-off picot edge,
and also a knitted-cast-on-knitted-chain picot edge for a loopier picot.



Knitted cast on



Make a slip knot and place onto left needle (counts as 1 cast-on stitch); *knit 1 without removing stitch from left needle,




slip new right stitch knitwise (with needles in agreement) back onto left needle;




repeat from * until desired number of stitches are on left needle.

Note that knitted cast-on stitches can sometimes pull closer together than with long tail or other methods, so it may be necessary to use a larger needle.



Picot cast on using knitted cast on bind off method

Note: Slip last st from right needle back to left needle knitwise after each series of bind-offs.




Using knitted cast on, CO4, then BO2, then slip last st from right needle back to left needle knitwise;




[CO6, BO2] until the desired number of sts have been cast on,




sl last st from right needle back to left needle.

Note that the number of stitches on the needle will always be the number cast on minus the number bound off. In the cast on row there will typically be a small gap above the picot. This will not be so apparent after the first row is worked.



Dancing with Bears


Picot cast on using knitted cast on knitted chain method

A knitted chain stitch is a worked similarly to a knitted cast on stitch, except that the stitch on the left needle IS removed after it's been knitted into.




Using knitted cast on, CO2; now work knitted chain (KC) as follows:
*knit 1 removing stitch from left needle,




slip new right stitch knitwise onto left needle;




repeat from * 3 more times (4 KC's have been worked);




*CO4,




KC4;
rep from * until the desired number of sts have been cast on,
sl last st from RN back to LN.


Verduri


Additional Notes:

While these photos show the newly-made right stitches being slipped back to the left needle, it is often more economical to simply leave the new stitch on the right needle and then insert the left needle into it knitwise to complete the next stitch, whether it is a cast-on stitch or a chain. Picot cast on instructions for the Verduri scarf (shown above) use this more economical method.

Note that the knitted chain stitches don't contribute to the number of cast on stitches. The chain will creat a large gap between stitches, and when the first row is worked, this will form an open picot loop.

The number of cast-on stitches as well as the number of bound-off or chained stitches between them can be varied as much as you want - for more stitches between picots work more knitted cast on stitches, for longer picots work more bind offs or more chains.